Wallace Stegner Books in Order

The Wallace Stegner books have become so popular over the years that generation after generation, people keep going back to them.

If you're just starting with it and want a reading list, you're in luck. Here we list out all the Wallace Stegner books in order; keeping in mind various factors like the publication year, reviews, its popularity among readers, etc.

It’s always a good idea to read such book titles in sequence so that you don't miss out on the story plot and its discussions in the book clubs.

Publication Order of Brude Mason Books

The Big Rock Candy Mountain

Stegner, Wallace 1943

A defining masterpiece by the “dean of Western writers” (The New York Times) and the Pulitzer Prize–winning author of Angle of Repose and Crossing to Safety   Bo Mason, his wife, Elsa, and their two boys live a transient life of poverty and despair.

Drifting from town to town and from state to state, the violent, ruthless Bo seeks out his fortune-in the hotel business, in new farmland, and, eventually, in illegal rum-running through the treacherous back roads of the American Northwest. In this affecting narrative, Wallace Stegner portrays over three decades in the life of the Mason family as they struggle to survive during the lean years of the early twentieth century.

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Recapitulation

Stegner, Wallace 1979

A classic novel from Wallace Stegner, and the "dean of Western writers" (The New York Times) and the Pulitzer Prize-winning author of Angle of Repose and Crossing to Safety--this is his the incredible, moving sequel to the bestselling Big Rock Candy Mountain.

Bruce Mason returns to Salt Lake City not for his aunt’s funeral, but to encounter the place he fled in bitterness forty-five years ago. A successful statesman and diplomat, Mason had buried his awkward childhood and sealed himself off from the thrills and torments of adolescence to become a figure who commanded international respect.

            Both the realities of the present recede in the face of ghosts of his past. As he makes the perfunctory arrangements for the funeral, we enter with him on an intensely personal and painful inner pilgrimage: we meet the father who darkened his childhood , the mother whose support was both redeeming and embarrassing, the friend who drew him into the respectable world of which he so craved to be a part, and the woman he nearly married.

In this profound book, the sequel to the bestselling The Big Rock Candy Mountain, Wallace Stegner has drawn an intimate portrait of a man understanding how his life has been shaped by experiences seemingly remote and inconsequential.

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Publication Order of American Folkways Books

Mormon Country

Stegner, Wallace 1942

Where others saw only sage, a salt lake, and a great desert, the Mormons saw their “lovely Deseret,” a land of lilacs, honeycombs, poplars, and fruit trees. Unwelcome in Ohio, Missouri, and Illinois, they migrated to the dry lands between the Rockies and the Sierra Nevada to establish Mormon country, a wasteland made green.

Like the land the Mormons settled, their habits stood in stark contrast to the frenzied recklessness of the American West. Opposed to the often prodigal individualism of the West, Mormons lived in closely knit – some say ironclad – communities.

The story of Mormon country is one of self-sacrifice and labor spent in the search for an ideal in the most forbidding territory of the American West. Richard W. Etulain provides a new introduction to this edition.

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Publication Order of Standalone Novels

Remembering Laughter

Wallace Stegner 1937

Margaret Stuart, the proud wife of a prosperous Iowa farmer, sets high standards for herself and others. Happy in her marriage, she tries to look the other way when her genial husband, Alec, takes to the bottle. When Elspeth, Margaret's sister, comes to live with them, the young woman is immediately captivated by the beauty and vitality of the farm, and by the affection she receives from those around her.

But as summer turns into fall, and the friendship between Alec and Elspeth deepens, Margaret finds her spirit tested by a series of events that seem as cruel and inevitable as the endless prairie winters.Long out of print, Remebering Laughter (1937) marked Wallace Stegner's brilliant literary debut.

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On a Darkling Plain

Wallace Stegner 1940
Wallace Stegner's 3rd book, and his first full-length novel. Very scarce. Read More

Fire and Ice

Stegner, Wallace 1941

Second Growth

Stegner, Wallace 1947

A New England village, untouched by history since the American Revolution, is the unquiet arena containing, but just barely, the aloof natives and the summer residents. Their paths cross, happily or disastrously, in a book that seems too real to be fiction.

As Wallace Stegner writes, the conflict on this particular frontier "has been reproduced in an endlessly changing pattern all over the United States." "Wallace Stegner's story about a rural community is told with subtle restraint in a style which is often poetic and always sensitive.

"—Chicago Sun Book Week"Incisive, restrained character delineation reminiscent of Willa Cather. Strongly recommended."—Library Journal"Second Growth . . . is a creation of remarkable penetration and skill. Its small, accurate touches build up to a full and firm whole.

Its objectivity, its air of knowledge and judgment, are accompanied by an almost lyrical, delicately restrained tenderness. Its prose is disciplined, sensitive and luminous."—New York Times

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Joe Hill: A Biographical Novel

Stegner, Wallace 1950

Wallace Stegner's remarkable portrait of Joe Hill, the man and the legend: from his entrance into the Industrial Workers of the World union, the most militant organization in the history of American labor, to his trial, imprisonment, and final martyrdom.

Blending fact with fiction, Wallace Stegner retells the story of Joe Hill--the Wobbly bard who became the stuff of legend when, in 1915, he was executed for the alleged murder of a Salt Lake City businessman. Organizer, agitator, "Labor's Songster"--a rebel from the skin inwards, with an absolute faith in the One Big Union--Joe Hill fought tirelessly in the frequently violent battles between organized labor and industry.

But though songs and stories still vaunt him, and his legend continues to inspire those who feel the injustices he fought against, Joe Hill may not have been a saintly crusader and may have been motivated by impulses darker than the search for justice.

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A Shooting Star

Stegner, Wallace 1961

Sabrina Castro, an attractive woman with a strong New England heritage, is married to a wealthy, older California physician who no longer fulfills her dreams. An almost accidental misstep leads her down the slow descent of moral disintegration, until there is no place for her to go but up and out.

How Sabrina comes to terms with her life is the theme of this absorbing personal drama, played out against the background of an old Peninsula estate where her mother lives among her servants, her memories of Boston, and her treasured family archives.

A Shooting Star displays the storytelling powers that Wallace Stagner's fans have enjoyed for more than half a century.

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All the Little Live Things

Stegner, Wallace 1967

Joe Allston, the retired literary agent of Stegner's National Book Award-winning novel, The Spectator Bird, returns in this disquieting and keenly observed novel. Scarred by the senseless death of their son and baffled by the engulfing chaos of the 1960s, Allston and his wife, Ruth, have left the coast for a California retreat.

And although their new home looks like Eden, it also has serpents: Jim Peck, a messianic exponent of drugs, yoga, and sex; and Marian Catlin, an attractive young woman whose otherworldly innocence is far more appealing—and far more dangerous.

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Angle of Repose

Stegner, Wallace 1971

An American masterpiece and iconic novel of the West by National Book Award and Pulitzer Prize winner Wallace Stegner—a deeply moving narrative of one family and the traditions of our national past.Lyman Ward is a retired professor of history, recently confined to a wheelchair by a crippling bone disease and dependant on others for his every need.

  Amid the chaos of 1970s counterculture he retreats to his ancestral home of Grass Valley, California, to write the biography of his grandmother: an elegant and headstrong artist and pioneer who, together with her engineer husband, made her own journey through the hardscrabble West nearly a hundred years before.

In discovering her story he excavates his own, probing the shadows of his experience and the America that has come of age around him.

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The Spectator Bird

Stegner, Wallace 1976

This tour-de-force of American literature and a winner of the National Book Award is a profound, intimate, affecting novel from one of the most esteemed literary minds of the last century and a beloved chronicler of the West.   Joe Allston is a cantankerous, retired literary agent who is, in his own words, "just killing time until time gets around to killing me.

" His parents and his only son are long dead, leaving him with neither ancestors nor descendants, tradition nor ties. His job, trafficking the talent of others, has not been his choice. He has passed through life as a spectator, before retreating to the woods of California in the 1970s with only his wife, Ruth, by his side.

When an unexpected postcard from a long-lost friend arrives, Allston returns to the journals of a trip he has taken years before, a journey to his mother's birth­place where he once sought a link with his past. Uncovering this history floods Allston with memories, both grotesque and poignant, and finally vindicates him of his past and lays bare that Joe Allston has never been quite spectator enough.

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Crossing to Safety

Wallace Earle Stegner 1987

Introduction by Terry Tempest Williams Afterword by T. H. Watkins   Called a “magnificently crafted story . . . brimming with wisdom” by Howard Frank Mosher in The Washington Post Book World, Crossing to Safety has, since its publication in 1987, established itself as one of the greatest and most cherished American novels of the twentieth century.

Tracing the lives, loves, and aspirations of two couples who move between Vermont and Wisconsin, it is a work of quiet majesty, deep compassion, and powerful insight into the alchemy of friendship and marriage.

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Publication Order of Collections

The Women on the Wall

Stegner, Wallace 1950

Written during World War II and its immediate aftermath, the eighteen stories of The Women on the Wall move from women to war and back again, but it is the women who remain central. There are Alma, a war bride who runs a farm better than the neighbor men; Lucy, a former WAAF, working through college; Tamsen, who keeps her husband drunk so she can do as she pleases; and the women on the wall, who, with nothing to do but wait for their husbands to return from the war, find their private consolations.

To these stories Wallace Stegner brings the same skill and thoughtfulness that won him the National Book Award for The Spectator Bird

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The City of the Living & Other Stories

Stegner, Wallace Earle 1956
Book by Stegner, Wallace Earle Read More

The Writer's Art

Stegner, Wallace Earle 1972

The Collected Stories of Wallace Stegner

Stegner, Wallace 1990
An anthology of short stories by the Pulitzer Prize-winning author features incisive, richly textured stories of the American heartland, in tales of love, friendship, the order and power of the natural world, and the chaotic contradictions of the human heart. Read More

Publication Order of Non-Fiction Books

Beyond the Hundredth Meridian

Stegner, Wallace 1954

From the “dean of Western writers” (The New York Times) and the Pulitzer Prize winning–author of Angle of Repose and Crossing to Safety, a fascinating look at the old American West and the man who prophetically warned against the dangers of settling it   In Beyond the Hundredth Meridian, Wallace Stegner recounts the sucesses and frustrations of John Wesley Powell, the distinguished ethnologist and geologist who explored the Colorado River, the Grand Canyon, and the homeland of Indian tribes of the American Southwest.

A prophet without honor who had a profound understanding of the American West, Powell warned long ago of the dangers economic exploitation would pose to the West and spent a good deal of his life overcoming Washington politics in getting his message across.

Only now, we may recognize just how accurate a prophet he was.

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This Is Dinosaur

Stegner, Wallace 1955

This Is Dinosaur was first published in 1955, in the midst of a bitter controversy over the proposed construction of dams at Echo Park. The outcome of the controversy--a congressional vote to prohibit the dams--"set in brass the principle that any part of the national park system should be immune from any sort of intrusion and damage," wrote Wallace Stegner in the 1985 edition of the book.

Reprinted with new color photographs, This Is Dinosaur still stands as a classic introduction to the historic, scenic, archeological, and biological resources of the Monument by an impressive array of writers.Contains the following essays:"The Marks of Human Passage" by Wallace Stegner"Geological Exhibit" by Eliot Backwelder"The Natural World of Dinosaur" by Olaus Murie and Joseph W.

Penfold"The Ancients of the Canyons" by Robert Lister"Fast Water" by Otis "Dock" Marston"A Short Look at Eden" by David Bradley"The National Park Idea" by Alfred A. Knopf

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Wolf Willow

Stegner, Wallace 1962

Wallace Stegner weaves together fiction and nonfiction, history and impressions, childhood remembrance and adult reflections in this unusual portrait of his boyhood. Set in Cypress Hills in southern Saskatchewan, where Stegner's family homesteaded from 1914 to 1920, Wolf Willow brings to life both the pioneer community and the magnificent landscape that surrounds it.

For more than seventy years, Penguin has been the leading publisher of classic literature in the English-speaking world. With more than 1,700 titles, Penguin Classics represents a global bookshelf of the best works throughout history and across genres and disciplines.

Readers trust the series to provide authoritative texts enhanced by introductions and notes by distinguished scholars and contemporary authors, as well as up-to-date translations by award-winning translators.

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The Gathering of Zion

Stegner, Wallace 1964

Pulitzer Prize-winning author Wallace Stegner tells about a thousand-mile migration marked by hardship and sudden death—but unique in American history for its purpose, discipline, and solidarity. Other Bison Books by Wallace Stegner include Mormon Country, Recapitulation, Second Growth, and Women on the Wall.

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Teaching the Short Story

Stegner, Wallace Earle 1966

The Sound of Mountain Water

Stegner, Wallace 1969

A book of timeless importance about the American West and a modern classic by National Book Award- and Pulitzer Prize-winning Wallace Stegner. The essays, memoirs, letters, and speeches collected in The Sound of Mountain Water encompass memoir, nature conservation, history, geography, and literature.

Compositions delve into the post-World War II boom that brought the Rocky Mountain West--from Montana and Idaho to Utah and Nevada--into the modern age. Other works feature eloquent sketches of the West's history and environment, directing our imagination to the sublime beauty of such places as Robbers Roost and Glen Canyon.

A final section examines the state of Western literature, of the mythical past and the diminished present, and analyzesd the difficulties facing any contemporary Western writer. Written over a period of twenty-five years, a time in which the West witnessed rapid changes to its cultural and natural heritage, and by a writer and thinker who will always hold a unique position in modern American letters, The Sound of Mountain Water is a hymn to the Western landscape, an affirmation of the hope emobided therein, and a careful and rich investigation of the West's complex legacy.

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Discovery! The Search for Arabian Oil

Stegner, Wallace 1971

Illuminating a little-known but extremely significant period in world history—the discovery of oil in the Middle East and the beginnings of what is now the Saudi Arabian Oil Company (Saudi Aramco)—this captivating history explores the birth of the Middle Eastern oil industry.

From the king and his royal court to the desert guides, scientists, and mechanics who built the original oil company, Aramco, the distant and desperately poor world of Depression-era Saudi Arabia is vividly brought to life. Written more than 50 years ago, this detailed account serves as a kind of time capsule and features the author’s prescient insights into the cultural and technological consequences of King Ibn Saud’s deliberate decision to choose America as his commercial ally.

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The Uneasy Chair

Stegner, Wallace 1974

"He was precocious, alert, intelligent, brash, challenging, irreverent, literary, self-conscious, insecure, often ostentatiously crude, sometimes insufferable," Wallace Stegner says of Bernard DeVoto, who, in the words of a childhood acquaintance, was also "the ugliest, most disagreeable boy you ever saw.

" Between the disagreeable boy and the literary lion, a life unfolds, full of comedy and drama, as told in this definitive biography, which brings together two exemplary American men of letters. Born within a dozen years of one another in small towns in Utah, both men were, as Stegner writes, "novelists by intention, teachers by necessity, and historians by the sheer compulsion of the region that shaped us.

" From this unique vantage point, Stegner follows DeVoto's path from his beloved but not particularly congenial Utah to the even less congenial Harvard where, galvanized by the disregard of the aesthetes around him, he commenced a career that, over three and a half decades, would embrace nearly every sort of literary enterprise: from modestly successful novels to prize-winning Western histories, from the editorship of the Saturday Review to a famously combative, long-running monthly column in Harper's, "The Easy Chair.

" A nuanced portrait of a stormy literary life, Stegner's biography of DeVoto is also a window on the tumultuous world of American letters in the twentieth century.

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The Writer in America

Stegner, Wallace Earle 1976
A notable group of six lectures plus an essay. Read More

One Way To Spell Man

Wallace Stegner 1982
A selection of essays by the Pulitzer Prize-winning novelist discusses God, man, the young and the mature writer, adulthood, the West, the desert, mountain men, myths, and Ansel Adams Read More

Conversations with Wallace Stegner on Western History & Literature

Stegner, Wallace Earle 1983

When Converstaion With Wallace Stegner was first published nearly ten years ago it was immediately hailed as a classic. In this revised edition, Stegner reacts to the changes that flooded over the American West in the 1980s. Stegner comments on sweeping environmental and socio-economic innovations as well as on notable transitions in western American literature.

Equally revealing are the backgrounds and interpretations Stegner supplies on his recent work. Finally, he summarizes what he considers his major contributions to western environmentalism and culture. All those interested in the American West and Stegner's remarkable career are sure to find this revised edition intriguing and rewarding fare.

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American Places

Stegner, Wallace 1985

A book about America by one of the greatest writers of the American West"This book is an attempt, by sampling, to say something about how the American people and the American land have interacted, how they have shaped one another; what patterns of life, with what chances of continuity, have arisen out of the confrontations between an unformed society and a virgin continent.

Perhaps it is less a book about the American land than some ruminationsabout the making of America. . . . We are the unfinished product of a long becoming." —from American PlacesFor more than seventy years, Penguin has been the leading publisher of classic literature in the English-speaking world.

With more than 1,700 titles, Penguin Classics represents a global bookshelf of the best works throughout history and across genres and disciplines. Readers trust the series to provide authoritative texts enhanced by introductions and notes by distinguished scholars and contemporary authors, as well as up-to-date translations by award-winning translators.

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The American West as Living Space

Stegner, Wallace 1987
A passionate work about the fragile and arid West that Stegner loves Read More

On the Teaching of Creative Writing

Stegner, Wallace 1988

One of America's finest writers talks about the difficulties, rewards, and importance of teaching creative writing.Wallace Stegner writes ". . . the language itself is an inheritance, a shared wealth. It may be played with, stretched, forced, bent; but I, as a writer or teacher, must never assume that it is mine.

It is ours, the living core, as well as the instrument, of the culture I derive from, resist, challenge, and--ultimately--serve. . . . nobody can teach anyone else to have a talent. All a teacher can do is set high goals for students--or get them to set them for themselves--and, then, try to help them reach those goals.

"A half-century's wisdom on teaching and learning creative writing is distilled in this brief discussion by one of America's pre-eminent authors. Anyone who has taught or participated in a creative writing class will find Stegner's insights invaluable.

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Wilderness at the Edge

Stegner, Wallace Earle 1991
Book by Stegner, Wallace Earle, Utah Wilderness Coalition Read More

Where the Bluebird Sings to the Lemonade Springs

Stegner, Wallace 1992

Nominated for a National Book Critics Circle award, Where the Bluebird Sings to the Lemonade Springs gathers together Wallace Stegner’s most important and memorable writings on the American West: its landscapes, diverse history, and shifting identity; its beauty, fragility, and power.

With subjects ranging from the writer’s own “migrant childhood” to the need to protect what remains of the great western wilderness (which Stegner dubs “the geography of hope”) to poignant profiles of western writers such as John Steinbeck and Norman Maclean, this collection is a riveting testament to the power of place.

At the same time it communicates vividly the sensibility and range of this most gifted of American writers, historians, and environmentalists.

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Marking the Sparrow's Fall

Stegner, Wallace 1998

Winner of three O. Henry Awards, the Commonwealth Gold Medal, the Pulitzer Prize, the National Book Award, and the Kirsch Award for Lifetime Literary Achievement, Wallace Stegner was a literary giant. In Marking the Sparrow's Fall, the first collection of Stegner's work published since his death, Stegner's son Page has collected, annotated, and edited fifteen essays that have never before been published in any edition, as well as a little-known novella and several of Stegner's best-known essays on the American West.

Seventy-five percent of the contents of this body of work is published here for the first time.

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On Teaching and Writing Fiction

Stegner, Wallace 2002

Wallace Stegner founded the acclaimed Stanford Writing Program-a program whose alumni include such literary luminaries as Larry McMurtry, Robert Stone, and Raymond Carver. Here Lynn Stegner brings together eight of Stegner's previously uncollected essays-including four never-before-published pieces -on writing fiction and teaching creative writing.

In this unique collection he addresses every aspect of fiction writing-from the writer's vision to his or her audience, from the use of symbolism to swear words, from the mystery of the creative process to the recognizable truth it seeks finally to reveal.

His insights will benefit anyone interested in writing fiction or exploring ideas about fiction's role in the broader culture.

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The Selected Letters of Wallace Stegner

Stegner, Wallace 2007

Wallace Stegner, recipient of the Pulitzer Prize in 1972, was a great writer. As an author, historian, teacher, and environmentalist, he influenced countless prominent individuals during his long life. Showcasing some of those relationships, these letters (written between 1933 and 1993) cover a broad range of topics, including literature, history, conservation, and Stanford.

Here are letters to colleagues, like Ansel Adams, friends and family, as well as many students who went on to become well–respected authors, among them Wendell Berry, John Daniel, Barry Lopez, William Kittredge, and Robert Stone.In 1946 he founded the prestigious Stegner Fellowship Program.

In 1961, his memos to then Secretary of the Interior Steward Udall set the tone and agenda for what would become the modern environmental movement. Here, in their entirety, are the letters that track it all. For a man who had no interest in writing an autobiography, they offer an inside look at his "unedited thoughts and opinions, and to a factual narrative untransformed by the literary imagination, to life lived before being lived," writes his son Page Stegner in his introduction.

Here is history as told through correspondence with people who helped shape literature, politics, and environmentalism in the twentieth century.

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The Selected Letters

Stegner, Wallace 2007

Wallace Stegner, recipient of the Pulitzer Prize in 1972, was a great writer. As an author, historian, teacher, and environmentalist, he influenced countless prominent individuals during his long life. Showcasing some of those relationships, these letters (written between 1933 and 1993) cover a broad range of topics, including literature, history, conservation, and Stanford.

Here are letters to colleagues, like Ansel Adams, friends and family, as well as many students who went on to become well–respected authors, among them Wendell Berry, John Daniel, Barry Lopez, William Kittredge, and Robert Stone.In 1946 he founded the prestigious Stegner Fellowship Program.

In 1961, his memos to then Secretary of the Interior Steward Udall set the tone and agenda for what would become the modern environmental movement. Here, in their entirety, are the letters that track it all. For a man who had no interest in writing an autobiography, they offer an inside look at his "unedited thoughts and opinions, and to a factual narrative untransformed by the literary imagination, to life lived before being lived," writes his son Page Stegner in his introduction.

Here is history as told through correspondence with people who helped shape literature, politics, and environmentalism in the twentieth century.

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Wallace Stegner's West

Wallace Stegner 2008

A collection as broad as the Great Basin and as dynamic as California s coastline fiction and essays by Wallace Stegner Literary critic Charles E. Cascio compared reading Wallace Stegner s short fiction to entering a great community, one that invites readers into a larger conversation, not through soaring prose or gimmicky plots, but with writing that is as real as the moment and as enduring as history.

In his nonfiction Stegner explores with equal skill the myth of the West, the region s past and future, and its realities. Los Angeles Times critic Scott Timberg recently wrote that Stegner shifted the center of gravity of the American literary world.

The West was not simply a source of inspiration to Stegner but a state of mind a revelatory concept to many people, particularly to fledging writers. In addition, Stegner, winner of the Pulitzer Prize and the National Book Award, and director and founder of Stanford University s creative writing program, influenced many writers: Wendell Berry, Edward Abbey, Ken Kesey, Larry McMurtry, James D.

Houston, and many more. In this selection assembled by his son Page, Stegner a brilliant observer and a master of language ranges with ease from John Wesley Powell s historic, hair-raising adventures on the Colorado River to the wry observations of a fictional modern-day curmudgeon on the West Coast.

This collection is simply a joy to read and an essential addition to any library on either side of the Mississippi.

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The Twilight of Self Reliance

Stegner, Wallace 2008

We can refresh ourselves with our own best image, and renew our image of America: not as Perfection, not as Heaven on Earth, not as New Jerusalem, but as flawed glory and exhilarating task.' –-from The Twilight of Self-Reliance: Frontier Values and Contemporary AmericaThe occasions of the centennial of Wallace Stegner’s birth on February 18, 1909, and the University of Utah Press’s announcement of the Wallace Stegner Publication Prize in Environmental and American Western History have provided the impetus for the re-publication of 'The Twilight of Self-Reliance: Frontier Values and Contemporary America,' which was originally delivered as a Tanner Lecture at the University of Utah on February 25, 1980.

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Publication Order of Anthologies

Prose and Poetry of the American West

Work, James C. 1991

Prose and Poetry of the American West is an extraordinarily comprehensive collection of short stories, poems, and essays about the American West that represents the extensive contributions of all its people: men, women, natives, and immigrants. The more than fifty authors included are listed according to their birth-dates; and their production, spanning four and a half centuries, is divided into four periods.

Work defines each period and shows how selected authors exemplify it. Among those representing the Emergence Period (1540–1832) of explorers and pioneers entering the American West (and a new state of consciousness) are Pedro de Castañeda, Meriwether Lewis and William Clark, Jedediah Smith, and Walt Whitman.

The Mythopoeic Period (1833–1889) is represented by, among others, Helen Hunt Jackson, Mark Twain, Bret Harte, Andy Adams, Owen Wister, Black Elk, Luther Standing Bear, Stephen Crane, Willa Cather, and John C. Neihardt. In the Neo-mythic Period (1890–1914), such authors as Thomas Hornsby Ferril, Man Sandoz, Frank Waters, Dorothy Johnson, Walter Van Tilburg Clark, Wallace Stegner, Wright Morris, and William Stafford begin revising the old myths of the American West.

Finally, in the Neo-western Period (1914 to the present) Edward Abbey, Gary Snyder, James Welch, Jimmy Santiago Baca, and others demonstrate how the land west of the ninety-eighth meridian has shaped the creative consciousness. This admirable anthology, filling a need long felt by readers, shows writers singing about the American West, the land of dreams; then recording great deeds in it; and finally turning to examine their thoughts about it.

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And that's the end of the complete list! Now that you have it - the next step for you is to of course purchase them and dive into reading Wallace Stegner books. Worry not, we've done the tedious job for you and added amazon direct book links including AudioBook, Kindle, Paperback and Hardcover versions as applicable.

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